Category Archives: Local attractions

Built in 1929, the Bruce Goff-designed Riverside Studio began as a combination home and music studio for a local piano teacher, according to the Tulsa Preservation Commission’s website. The ascending and descending lines of windows were inspired by musical scales, … Continue reading

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As Christmas approaches, we thought we’d spotlight a few of Tulsa’s unique shopping districts. This week, we’ll wander through Utica Square, which marked its 50th anniversary in May. Located at the corner of Utica Avenue and 21st Street, Utica Square … Continue reading

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Mount Zion Baptist Church is a survivor. Twice in its history, the Greenwood community, better known as “Black Wall Street,” has lost significant structures. In 1921, the Tulsa Race Riot wiped out most of the buildings in Greenwood. New buildings … Continue reading

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According to its website, Cain’s Ballroom was built as a garage in 1924 before being repurposed as a “dime-a-dance joint” and then a dancing academy. Known as the birthplace of Western swing, Cain’s features glass-block windows, a spring-loaded dance floor, … Continue reading

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A crowd of Route 66 supporters gathered Friday afternoon next to the Arkansas River to witness the dedication of┬áthe long-anticipated “East Meets West” sculpture. The sculpture, whose installation we have chronicled on this blog over the past few weeks, depicts … Continue reading

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Constructed in 1916, the Eleventh Street Arkansas River Bridge predates Route 66 by a decade. The bridge provided a vital link between Tulsa and the rich oil fields in nearby Garden City, Red Fork, and beyond. Its historical significance increased … Continue reading

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At first glance, the Cosden Building, 409 S. Boston Ave., appears to be much taller than it really is. The structure — better known as the Mid-Continent Building — is 16 stories high and dates to 1918, but it appears … Continue reading

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