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A look back at 1943

A former Casa Loma Hotel guest and longtime friend of the Max Campbell Building and its owners recently gave Aaron a big stack of vintage ephemera, including several historic magazines. One of our favorite treasures from this collection was a copy of LIFE Magazine dated Jan. 11, 1943. Virtually everything in the magazine, from articles to ads, revolved around the war effort. Here’s an ad designed specifically to appeal to Rosie the Riveter and her colleagues:

“I’m the mechanic with the soft, white hands!” brags the wide-eyed, wrench-wielding woman, extolling the virtues of Hinds hand cream in protecting women’s skin from the ravages of the workday. Here’s the full text of the ad, in case you can’t read the tiny print:

Working in grease and grime — that’s all in the day’s job. Ruin my hands? No, ma’am! I use Hinds before and after work. Hinds creamy skin-softeners help guard my hands against drying, ground-in dirt. After work, Hinds gives my hands a whiter look — soft and nifty!

No redness! No chapping! Nice hands that thrill after using HINDS — that HONEY of a lotion!

VICTORY FIRST! OUR POLICY not to use any ingredients now requested for war use LEHN & FINK Products Corporation

HONEY — Beauty Advisor, says:

EXTRA-SOFTENING! Hinds is an extra-creamy emulsion of skin-softening ingredients.

WORKS FAST! Even one application of Hinds gives red, chapped skin a softer, whiter look … a comfy feel.

EFFECT LASTS! Hinds skin-softeners help protect skin through work and soapy-water jobs.

DOES GOOD! Not gummy, not sticky — doesn’t just cover up roughness. Actually beneftis skin.

At toilet goods counters

BUY WAR SAVINGS BONDS AND STAMPS NOW!

HINDS for HANDS and wherever skin needs softening!

Copyright, 1942, by Lehn & Fink Products Corp., Bloomfield, N.J.

Those of you familiar with American history will recall that women entered the workforce in great numbers, taking on traditionally male-dominated professions, to fill the gaps left by soldiers who were drafted and sent overseas to fight in World War II. This ad serves a dual purpose: Not only does it help create demand for a product, but it addresses women’s fears about losing their femininity by going to work in sometimes rough, dirty environments. Could a woman do “man’s work” and still be a lady? Of course — just use Hinds hand cream and have the best of both worlds!

Too bad Spa Maxx wasn’t open back then. Some of Katie’s almond-scented scrub and a paraffin treatment would have done wonders for a mechanic’s skin. (If your hands could use a little help, give us a call at (918) 744-5500 to book a manicure and a paraffin dip. Come in for a shellac manicure on Sunday, and the paraffin dip is free!)

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