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Peek into the past

As you’ve probably surmised in reading this blog, Tulsa has a strong sense of its own history. The cultural capital of Oklahoma is rich in historical resources. One of our favorites here at the Campbell is the Beryl Ford Collection, which is an enormous collection of historic photographs of people, places, and events from Tulsa’s past. The collection, which includes literally thousands of images and documents, would be impressive enough by itself, but its usefulness is amplified exponentially by the fact that it has been digitized and made available online through the Tulsa City-County Library.

Here are just a few of the many, many images in the collection:

1904 Arkansas River toll bridge. Turkey Mountain is visible in the background. The sign on top of the bridge says, "They said we couldn't do it, but we did," a reference to bureaucratic hangups that delayed the construction of the bridge. (Photo courtesy of the Beryl Ford Collection/Rotary Club of Tulsa, Tulsa City-County Library and Tulsa Historical Society. )

J.M. Hall General Store, 1890. This was located on Main Street just south of the railroad. (Photo courtesy the Beryl Ford Collection/Rotary Club of Tulsa, Tulsa City-County Library and Tulsa Historical Society.)

Tulsa's first hospital. (Photo courtesy the Beryl Ford Collection/Rotary Club of Tulsa, Tulsa City-County Library and Tulsa Historical Society.)

Warehouse Market, built in 1929. This building still stands at the corner of Elgin and 11th Street (Route 66) and is one of the city's Art Deco gems. (Photo courtesy Beryl Ford Collection/Rotary Club of Tulsa, Tulsa City-County Library and Tulsa Historical Society.)

Tulsa is sometimes known as the city that oil built. This 1901 photo shows the city's first oil well, the Sue Bland No. 1, which was in what was then Red Fork. A historical marker across the street from Ollie's Station Restaurant on Route 66 now identifies the site of the well that began the oil boom. (Photo courtesy Beryl Ford Collection/Rotary Club of Tulsa, Tulsa City-County Library and Tulsa Historical Society.)

You get the idea. With more than 22,000 items, the Beryl Ford Collection should have plenty to keep you occupied. You can find it online here. Have fun exploring the past!

After you finish surfing Tulsa’s history, consider planning a trip to town to experience it firsthand at the lovingly restored Campbell Hotel. Built in 1927, the Campbell has retained its historic charm without sacrificing any of the amenities of modern life. Call us at (918) 744-5500 or visit us online at www.thecampbellhotel.com to reserve your room here at the Campbell, where history meets hospitality.

 

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One Response to Peek into the past

  1. Tulsa Library says:

    We also have quite a few photos in our Beryl Ford Collection for which we have no identification so we have been soliciting the public for help. You can see our sets of Unknown People and Places, as well as those photos which the public has helped identify, at http://www.flickr.com/photos/tulsalibrary/collections/72157627156140585/. Thanks for the nice words!
    Tulsa Library

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